Types of Chee Cheong Fun @ Rice Noodle Roll

My friend L has once again came up with new findings. This time she outdid herself by going all over Malaysia (almost) in search of all types of chee cheong fun. I had talked about this particular special noodle before, and the one I showed was the fried style. This one is the true way chee cheong fun is served, but of course in also its many varieties. Let’s see what L had come up with, after a series of searching, tasting, analyzing and documenting (now I sound like I studied too much).

Chee Cheong Fun: The Breakdown

When I was growing up, ‘chee cheong fun’ was one of the foods I grew up eating. It is basically steamed flat rice noodles (about a finger’s diameter), cut up into little pieces and then served with a dash of sesame seed and sauce. Now, I can’t tell you what kind of sauce in particular because as the years go by, and when I began to venture out of my humble old town, I realized to my delight, that ‘chee cheong fun’ comes in different variations in different regions.

In my old town Taiping, ‘chee cheong fun’ comes with a rich dose of sesame and fried onions and a type of red sauce which is pretty sweet. The makers would usually add some chilli sauce alongside, to enrich its taste. Sweet is pretty blunt for a Chinese cuisine, you see.

Taiping Chee Cheong Fun @ Rice Noodle Roll
Taiping Chee Cheong Fun @ Rice Noodle Roll

There’s another type of ‘chee cheong fun’ found here and pretty much everywhere else, called the Hong Kong ‘chee cheong fun’. Steam flour noodles, with shelled prawns and pork embedded in between. It usually comes with soy sauce as its gravy, topped with fried onions and again, sesame seed.

Hong Kong Chee Cheong Fun @ Rice Noodle Roll
Hong Kong Chee Cheong Fun @ Rice Noodle Roll

Then, found in central Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur’s ‘chee cheong fun’ is actually my favorite among all. Again, the signature steam flour noodles and sesame seed, the version here allows you to choose from a choice or steam or fried ‘yong tau fu’ to accompany your noodles. Garnished with fried onions as well, it is a great alternative to rice.

KL Chee Cheong Fun @ Rice Noodle Roll
KL Chee Cheong Fun @ Rice Noodle Roll

Way up north in the gourmet island of Penang, the ‘chee cheong fun’ here, is of sweet taste. Thanks to its sauce which is made up of chilli, rojak paste and peanut paste. Again, it comes served with sesame seed.

Penang Chee Cheong Fun @ Rice Noodle Roll
Penang Chee Cheong Fun @ Rice Noodle Roll

I hope you enjoy my ‘chee cheong fun’ review found here in Malaysia. If I missed out any version, please drop your comments and till then, happy eating!

*Food, glorious food* – Ice Age 2

Gula Melaka Biscuits : Comfort Food from Home

Alright, what is this naughty girl doing here when she is supposed to be studying? Well, she just misses her blogging life and intended to at least post something. I have just tackled the first paper this morning, and hopefully I’ve done well, I wrote till my hand got sore. That should be good news right?

Anyway, mum had just bought a yummy biscuit made in my home town, Taiping, which she had dad brought up to KL for me. My dad works here and he travels back fortnightly. I’ve tried biscuit before, and had an almost addictive liking to it, which I “naturally” mentioned to mum, and so, she bought 2 boxes for me this time! Thank you mum!

It is just what I needed, a non-homemade-as-I-do-not-have-the-time comfort food to fight the exam blues.

Gula Melaka Biscuits

Gula Melaka Biscuits
Gula Melaka Biscuits

It’s a sort of biscuit, with thick floury and buttery skin, wrapped around gula melaka, which is already all chewy and sweet. It has good combination of texture and taste which just have your hands keep crawling back into the box for more! By the way, the box is really cool, it has the picture of the Taiping lake garden at the top.

Gula Melaka Biscuits Box
Gula Melaka Biscuits Box

Now, I have to stop ranting or I’ll start to sound like a girl gone mad from studying, back to where I belong now, the books!

Chinese New Year Food in Malaysia

Back from missing in action. Chinese New Year had been a blast this year. As usual, I will be back in my hometown, Taiping and celebrated with family and friends.

As I am getting back on track from my holiday mood to my working routine, time is slipping away pretty quickly. As for now, I’m leaving you guys with pictures of the wonderful tummy-filled CNY celebration that I had. Enjoy!

Pho Pho Stir-frying vegetables
Pho Pho Stir-frying vegetables

Pho Pho (mum’s mother) shredding the pre-soaked black fungus

Nyonya Loh Hon Chai (Fried Mixed Vegetables)
Nyonya Loh Hon Chai (Fried Mixed Vegetables)

Loh Hon Chai (Fried Mixed Vegetables)

Jiu Hu Char (Stir fried shredded Cuttlefish with Yam Bean)
Jiu Hu Char (Stir fried shredded Cuttlefish with Yam Bean)

My absolute all time favourite Jiu Hu Char (Stir fried shredded Cuttlefish with Yam Bean)

Stir Fried Mix Vegetables with Chinese Mushrooms
Stir Fried Mix Vegetables with Chinese Mushrooms

Another Stir Fried Mix Vegetables with Chinese Mushrooms

Fresh Crabs!
Fresh Crabs!

Live crab waiting to be cooked. We Chinese only eat the freshest from the sea.

Chinese Crab in Tomato Sauce
Chinese Crab in Tomato Sauce

Cooked Crab in Tomato Sauce, a little kick from ginger, spring onion and chillies

Steamed Chicken
Steamed Chicken

Steamed chicken, a must have for every Chinese household on reunion

Steamed Chicken
Steamed Chicken

The steamed chicken chopped and served sprinkled with chinese parsley

Pork Tripe Pepper Soup
Pork Tripe Pepper Soup

My aunt chopping the boiled pork tripe from the soup to bite sizes

Steamed Fish
Steamed Fish

Taking out the steamed fish (fresh from the sea too)

Pho Pho
Pho Pho

Pho Pho enjoying the food while waiting for the fish to steam

Homemade Yee Sang
Homemade Yee Sang

Yee Sang – We have it every year over at my mother’s side, whenever we can meet up either the reunion day or Chor Yat/Chor Yee (first/second day of Chinese New Year). This Yee Sang of ours is self made, with the carrots and radishes freshly sliced thinly (no shredding as it will sweat too much) and then Pomelo freshly shred to pieces. The hues of greens and beige stripes are papaya pickles. In the middle is our main ingredient of the dish – abalone slices. The red packets contained Five Spice Powder and crushed peanuts ready to be sprinkled over the Yee Sang later.

Lou Sang!
Lou Sang!

Once ready to serve , crispy dough crackers are scattered all around the dish. Next the spices and peanuts are sprinkled over follow by pouring of plum sauce over it. We would then gear ourselves with chopsticks and then simultaneously toss the Yee Sang all over. As belived, the higher you toss the better. We usually end up with bits and pieces on our hand due to the crazy tossing by everyone.

Lou lou lou!
Lou lou lou!

Then all of proceed to scoop everything out onto our bowls and devour it. We would of course aim for the abalones but at last, we would end up distributing to each other anyway. The Yee Sang definitely tasted good, with fresh ingredients, right plethora of tastes of sweet and sour plus right textures of soft, chewy, crunchy and juicy all together. I looked forward to it every year. If you want to know more about this, Foodcrazee have an extensive information on his own deconstructed Yee Sang.
Overall, a lovely Chinese New Year, with jeans a little tighter, wallet a bit fatter (from all the Ang Pows), heart a little fonder and of course, smile a little wider!